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independent state. israel has the right to live in peace and security with its neighbors. there is no substitute for negotiations. today's vote underscores the urgency of meaningful negotiations. we must give a do impetus to ensure an independent democratic state of palestine lives with a secure state of israel. i urge the parties to renew their commitment for negotiating peace. i count on all to act responsibly, preserve your treatment in state building under the leadership of president abbas and the prime minister. thank you. [applause] >> i think the secretary-general of the united nations for a statement. >> we will break away from the united nations where they have approved palestine f nineor nonmember status by a vote of 138 in favor. 41 countries abstained. i will take you now back to capitol hill. former congressional leaders and vice president joe biden will pay tribute to former new hampshire senator. he died november 19 at the age of 82. he was a key player in the budget negotiation for the 1980's and the ranking republican during the iran- contra hearings. dav
a hero. i would like your opinion about what is going on right now with israel and palestine. to gaza. i think they are acting upon hamas in order to put their blame -- against iran and see what your opinions would be. guest: that has been a mess for a long time and i believe we should be noninterventionists. we should not pick sides. i think it would be best for israel and best for that whole region, so i don't believe in getting involved. it is a real mess. it's been created by too much and too many outsiders interfering. but this gaza thing, i mean, attacking and bombing gaza, that doesn't make a whole lot of sense. what threat are the palestinians? to israel or anybody else? they are living in total poverty. they have an employment rate probably about 50%. sure, there are going to be militants. you have to understand why they're militants. you know, what is the reasons? they have been held more or less in bondage for decades now. it's a real mess. i think we should not be involved. i think the people there should solve the problems and eventually israel won't be able to depend upon t
on in the middle east because they are getting one biased israel view. i can tell you what is going on. i love president assad. i stand with them. there has always been peace there. the women wear jeans, they'd drive, they vote. it is more of a democracy and a lot of ways and here. host: what do you think policy should be regarding syria? 5000 people killed in the uprising. caller: those rebels are not syrian. they were planted there. it is really funny. when obama put troops into israel, i think he did all of this for reelection. i am relieved mitt romney did not get elected even though i did not vote for either. i think obama might do the right thing and cut ties with israel. host: we will go to a report actually on syrian president assad. this in "usa today." he said "i am not a puppet." we have a few minutes left on the first segment of "the washington journal." we will go to pete in rhode island on the democrat line. caller: good morning. i would like to see him focus on the economy. host: specifically what part? caller: let's go with the fiscal cliff coming up. my thoughts were my belief
the israel hamas ceasefire. tomorrow on "washington journal," shibley telhami on the latest developments on israel hamas cease-fire. then, poverty in the united states. after that, jacqueline pata discusses with the sequestration and fiscal cliff could mean to native american communities. 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. in 2004, jeff fager took over as executive producer of "60 minutes." last week he spoke to students about journalism and the future of network news. this is just over one hour. >> good evening, everyone. the cronkite school has a special relationship with cbs news. walter cronkite served as the evening news anger for nearly 20 years becoming known as the most trusted man in america for his objective, straightforward reporting. he was the face of cbs. three years after he stepped down from the news anger desk, the school was named in is honored. that grew over the next 25 years. today three years after his passing, he continues to be our guiding light. it is truly a special honor to have jeff fager with us tonight to talk about the traditional values of journalism and how tho
by -- met by some tough language from the security council. not from the government, israel or anyone. it was the security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. of course we know that this system worked extremely well. it was 100% performance as a matter of fact. it's not bad for any u.n. organization to get the task and then i think it's probably the only one which succeeded to make it 100% performance. so the -- that means that both destruction capabilities and the monetary capabilities were forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that expe
this panel is syria. but what is happening in israel as we gather here this week? these are the questions of our time. these are the challenges of our generation and. that, i think, is one of the great benefits of opportunities like halifax, to have a very in- depth discussion on how we got as a community -- a community of democracies, a community of countries that care, are compassionate, and are able to do something to stop the slaughter of innocent civilians. >> there were many who say we need to have more young emerging democracies that need to be stepping up to the plate and taking on more of your responsibilities. indonesia, india, brazil, turkey, south africa, but at the same time, we also hear the statements made that as they get involved and should step up to the plate in helping to nurture democracy come to protest human rights, but that they also have to make sure there roadhouses in order. what are your thoughts on that? >> certainly, more nations now have their role to play. definitely, in our case, we're trying to play a role based on our experience. as you might know, our c
to be. that is a matter between israel and the palestinians, and the u.s. can nudge and between and all of that. but in the end, if netanyahu and the palestinians are not in the position to bring resolution to this, then at it is not really going to be something that president obama can do. certainly something he would like very much to do. netanyahu -- i mean, now that the election is over, i think we will see prime minister netanyahu have a recalculation of the relationship with obama and how it has to go forward. it has not been close in the previous four years. it has been pragmatic and grudgingly accepting a reality on both sides, but there is an opportunity for that to change. host: do you have thoughts on that, scott? guest: just a follow-up. netanyahu had a personal relationship with romney and was a very secret about who he wanted to win the election and that was not president obama, who applied quite a bit of pressure to israel in his first term to try to secure a peace deal called israel settlements in the west bank. israel felt sort of hard-done by a lot of this bit of the a
with israel and palestine. possible actions against iran and may be pulling us in. guest: that has been a mess for a long time and we should not take sides. it would be best for that region. i don't believe in getting involved. has been created by to many outsiders interfering. -- that doesn't make a lot of sense. what threat are the palestinians? they are living in total poverty. sure, there are going to be militants. what is the reason? they have been held in bondage for decades. i think we should not be involved. eventually is real and not be able to depend on the united states -- eventually israel will not be able to depend on the united states. it makes no sense to do that. that is what they are anxious for us to do. what happens when we go broke and when it is acknowledged and we cannot afford to feed ourselves? our military is going to go home. we will not be there to take care of israel. all the people we have offended around the world, they are going to gang up on us and it will not be good for israel because we will not be capable of providing protection. host: this is the front page
to supporters on capitol hill. she was joined by representative steve israel and congressman steny hoyer of maryland. >> it is going to be a good evening. our president is going to be our president. steve israel is assuring me we will pick up states in the house and yes, we think we're going to take back the house. i am so pleased to be year. -- to be here. we are fighting for the priorities our country knows are important. for the values that this country knows is critically important. for investing in education, in growing our jobs in america, in investing in protecting our environment and investing in the health care of our people. americans believe lyonesse priorities. i want to congratulate my friend steve israel for the extraordinary job he has done. i have gone through this country, i have been in almost 90 districts, 89 districts in this country. campaigning with extraordinary candidates. some incumbents khomeni challengers. they are extraordinary people who will do an excellent, outstanding job as a members of the congress. steve israel has set an objective. he has worked hard a
this. -- hand did this. >> israel. it works. >> you are an idealist. >> it is about seeing the world for what it can be and not what it is. [ticking] >> ready, set, go. >> oh my god! >> plenty of life on the seafloor. ♪ >> wow. the only way off is up. >> the world according to sean. >> it is not sad. [ticking] >> there is a suctive nate to the music. ♪ >> it is the story of a people and it grabs you. yes. ♪ >> it is not my cup of tea. had it all ♪ have ♪ >> what should i call you? >> i did not want to wear clothes today. >> on the stage, you are a seductress. where did you learn that? >> i am a woman. like experiences. -- life experiences. ♪ >> such a fleet the person -- >> such a flaky person. >> action. >> you think some day we will be 3d? >> we will have the same interview but in 38. god help us all. >> looked at best. -- look at this. >> oh! >> what am i going to do? shut up? you will never shut me up. >> how are you doing? >> i am doing well. good to see you. >> "60 minutes." >> i am anderson cooper. >> we will be back next week with another addition of "60 minutes -
the destruction of israel and the destruction of the united states -- when a mad man speak, listen and pay attention. that was the problem with the obama administration. they did not pay attention and a tragedy ensue. whinnied members of congress that will ask tough questions, and we did. >> the portion of the debate where we will allow you to make the 32nd closing statement. we begin with jim graves. >> thank you. our country is on a course toward a train wreck, if fiscal train wreck. we have to stop it before it happens. if we do not deal with it it will deal with us, and it will be in not good outcome. we have seen that michele bachmann has been in congress six years. she has not been able to curb the cost curve and has not been able to stop the escalation and spiralling of the debt. i'm a business person who will come to congress and make things happen, bring people together. i'm a fiscally conservative and i'll make this congress work and do the heavy lifting. we will not raise taxes on in a class, never on the middle- class. we will make this happen. >> you have 30 seconds. >> i want
one nation that we should be nation-building with, and that's israel. because israel -- israel is -- that's god's chosen land. the jews are god's chosen people. host: ok, connie, let's give fred barnes a chance to comment. guest: well, i mean that was an issue between romney who was much more pro israel though publicly in particular. we'll see how that turns out. i personally don't begrudge him a vacation after the campaign, like to take one myself. but there was another part -- oh, yeah. what she said in the beginning about the republican party. is it really in deep trouble? i don't think so. obviously hispanics are a problem. younger senators and governors, they have 30 governors who are extremely important, 30 out of 50. like bob mcdonald in virginia and bobby jindal and scott walker in wisconsin and so on. republicans actually -- romney actually won i believe the middle class. if you have the middle class as people who make between $50,000 a year and $100,000 a year, romney won that group narrowly. the middle class is up for grabs but romney did well enough there but just n
syria and have an impact and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about, for example, movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and they could have an impact not just within syria but on the reas a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys are going to be traveling to various meetings taking place with the international community and the opposition. we consider them a legitimate representative of the aspirations of the syrian people. we're not yet prepared to recognize them as some sort of government in exile. but we do think it is it's a broad-based representative group. one of the questions we're going to continue to express is making sure that that opposition is committed to a democratic syria, an inclusive syria, a moderate syria. we have seen extremist elements insinuate themselves into the opposition. and one of the things that we have to be on gourd about, particularly when wi
and shorter. not only do we see china, israel, others have drones' now, saudi arabia has drones now, we are probably going to be dealing with the other side of that. we are daily dealing with cyber attacks on our infrastructure. the answer to your question is, it can reinforce the existing power structures but it can also empower non-stage actors far faster than we get reinforced. >> i would say that his point is a fair one except, coming back to us, i think we have kept ourselves still in this environment of being extremely competitive. you reference an area that is a key one for the united states, and that is energy. the united states is number one in natural gas. the united states has been working very aggressively in ensuring that it is energy independent. just the other day, "the wall street journal" highlighted that the united states has grown exponentially in terms of its own oil production. i think we're going to see more of that. you were describing an important range of changes, but another one this going to matter in terms of the overall geopolitical calculation and our provi
a resolution this afternoon that supports israel's right to self- defense. members approved the resolution but a voice vote with no debate. the house is back on tuesday, november 27, live coverage on c- span. >> the miami book fair is live this weekend with two days of nonfiction books, your calls, e- mails, and tweets. the panel will include his widow. our live coverage starts on saturday at 10:00 eastern. tsin us online for the cha on facebook. >> for the last half century, the discussion of the assassination has been dominated by two schools of thought. i will briefly describe each of them and how they approached the evidence in the case. to begin with, there is the church of the lone assassin which insists both oswald and ruby were lone nuts who murdered for their own reasons. on the other side, we have the church of the grand conspiracy. they are frequently made about what they think did happen and who was responsible. but they are convinced there was a large conspiracy, usually involving figures in the u.s. government, and a massive cover- up. >> this weekend, 49 years later, questio
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15